M. Aurelio su congiunti, comunità e e isolamento

Κλάδος τοῦ προσεχοῦς κλάδου ἀποκοπεὶς οὐ δύναται μὴ καὶ τοῦ ὅλου φυτοῦ ἀποκεκόφθαι. οὕτω δὴ καὶ ἄνθρωπος ἑνὸς ἀνθρώπου ἀποσχισθεὶς ὅλης τῆς κοινωνίας ἀποπέπτωκε. κλάδον μὲν οὖν ἄλλος ἀποκόπτει· ἄνθρωπος δὲ αὐτὸς ἑαυτὸν τοῦ πλησίον χωρίζει μισήσας καὶ ἀποστραφείς, ἀγνοεῖ δὲ ὅτι καὶ τοῦ ὅλου πολιτεύματος ἅμα ἀποτέτμηκεν ἑαυτόν. πλὴν ἐκεῖνό γε δῶρον τοῦ συστησαμένου … Continue reading M. Aurelio su congiunti, comunità e e isolamento

This summer, I read about anger

This summer, I read about anger: I read a book about anger itself and two very angry books (for different reasons). After finishing the whole thing, I feel somehow cleansed by the process, even though at first it was not a conscious choice. In hindsight, I really needed to stop and think about the many … Continue reading This summer, I read about anger

Harry Potter e la Pietra Filosofale. Esercizio di traduzione italiano-greco antico

(dalla lezione di Prova scritta di Greco di martedì 18 dicembre 2018, con un ringraziamento ad Anna ed Elisa, e l'aiuto di Andrew Wilson) Testo italiano: «Nicolas Flamel» mormorò in tono d'importanza, «è l'unico di cui si sappia che ha fabbricato la Pietra Filosofale!» Ma non sortì precisamente l'effetto che si aspettava. «La che?» chiesero … Continue reading Harry Potter e la Pietra Filosofale. Esercizio di traduzione italiano-greco antico

Dionigi di Alicarnasso in margine a “Come non scrivere” di Claudio Giunta

Dalla lezione di oggi, in margine a Claudio Giunta, Come non scrivere, Torino: UTET 2018. Dionigi di Alicarnasso, Περὶ συνθέσεως ὀνομάτων [De compositione verborum] 6 [1] Δοκεῖ μοι τῆς συνθετικῆς ἐπιστήμης τρία ἔργα εἶναι· ἓν μὲν ἰδεῖν, τί μετὰ τίνος ἁρμοζόμενον πέφυκε καλὴν καὶ ἡδεῖαν λήψεσθαι συζυγίαν· ἕτερον δὲ γνῶναι τῶν ἁρμόττεσθαι μελλόντων πρὸς ἄλληλα … Continue reading Dionigi di Alicarnasso in margine a “Come non scrivere” di Claudio Giunta

Sulle migrazioni (Seneca, Cons. Helv. 7)

Perché leggere i classici? [Dall'esercitazione di latino di venerdì scorso una traduzione semi-improvvisata di un brano a cui non ho smesso di pensare per giorni] Seneca, Consolatio ad Helviam matrem 7, 1-7 [1] A caelestibus agedum te ad humana converte; videbis gentes populosque universos mutasse sedem. Quid sibi volunt in mediis barbarorum regionibus Graecae urbes? … Continue reading Sulle migrazioni (Seneca, Cons. Helv. 7)

Classics and Class Membership. The case of Robert Galbraith’s Lethal White

[This blog post is brought to you by yet another long train ride, when I cannot write a word more about cardinal Bessarion’s notebook or further prepare for class] For months I have waited for the latest Robert Galbraith’s book. I have been a JK Rowling fan for almost two decades now, and I was … Continue reading Classics and Class Membership. The case of Robert Galbraith’s Lethal White

There was an Italian, a bunch of Americans, and a French guy…

On the International Byzantine Greek Summer School (Dublin, Trinity College, July 30-Aug. 10, 2018) Summer schools are weird, in a good way. You get thrown in a random city with a group of equally nerdy strangers and, for one or two weeks, you get to do something you love for so many hours you actually … Continue reading There was an Italian, a bunch of Americans, and a French guy…

Erse Valgimigli. A Forgotten Woman Classical Scholar

There’s a woman Classical scholar I often think of, for some reason: her name was Erse Valgimigli. Now, if you have never consulted volume XXXIII of the Aristoteles Latinus, you probably have never heard of her. She figures as an editor of Guilielmus of Moerbecke’s translation of Aristotle’s Poetics: Aristoteles Latinus, XXXIII. De arte poetica, … Continue reading Erse Valgimigli. A Forgotten Woman Classical Scholar

Signore e Signorine, a.k.a. the Book that Probably Changed Everything (for me)

Disclaimer: This blog entry will feature some Italian because I’ll speak about a book that a) was written in my native language; b) I also read in my native language (duh). I, however, have chosen to write this in English a) because it’s my favourite modern language; b) because the Internet runs on English. Recently … Continue reading Signore e Signorine, a.k.a. the Book that Probably Changed Everything (for me)